Bodily Functions in Writing

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Sheepy-Pie

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Re: Bodily Functions in Writing
« Reply #15 on: July 31, 2017, 06:02:40 PM »
@Jedi Knight Muse : That definitely sounds like IBS to me - my friend has it which is why we can talk poop etc so easily as it comes up a lot. She takes peppermint tablets to help, so might be worth looking into :)


I didn't write it off as comedic, I just have 90% of my poo stories etc be comedic (or laughing at my own like when they vanish in the toilet [I'm not a child seriously] :D ). The ones I have read about have all been serious, and two have been kidnapping situations. One girl was chained up so had to scoot to the side as much as possible to do her business, and the other was a boy locked up in a room in the darkness. He ended up doing it in the corner.

I like that you've included the routine piss, it's a good detail :) 

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Jedi Knight Muse

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Re: Bodily Functions in Writing
« Reply #16 on: July 31, 2017, 06:13:11 PM »
@Jedi Knight Muse : That definitely sounds like IBS to me - my friend has it which is why we can talk poop etc so easily as it comes up a lot. She takes peppermint tablets to help, so might be worth looking into :)

I take what the gastro doctor subscribed, which is Bentyl (no idea what the medical term on the prescription bottle is for it offhand). I'm at the point now where I only have to take it when my stomach hurts, and it usually helps pretty quickly. I got to the point ages ago (like, probably before the surgery) where taking Peptobismol stopped working.  :-\ I wonder if it would work for me now if I started taking it again instead of the Bentyl. Although if I really do have IBS, then I guess the Pepto wouldn't necessarily be the best thing either. Bentyl is prescribed specifically FOR IBS.

A large part of it is definitely dietary, I think. My diet is TERRIBLE. But I'm so picky with food that it's harder for me to make it less terrible.
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Elena

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Re: Bodily Functions in Writing
« Reply #17 on: August 22, 2017, 02:06:27 PM »
I have written about bodily functions when the plot required it. I had a poopacalypse in a RP - because it happens on a Navy ship when the cook had put something spoiled in the food all sailors ate for lunch, then they went on the rigging to do their watches... and they can't just leave their position and go to the heads (ie toilet)... and think a flagship of 400 people who had eaten the same thing! And the officers of course thought worse than food poisoning what it was - they thought cholera or disentery... which meant not only massive deaths but also quarantine for the ship...

The discussion about periods happens briefly usually when a young woman gets pregnant and has no idea. Because there was no sex ed in 1700s or before... Miscarriages and births happened too, and brief mentions of peeing if the story made it significant to mention. Seasickness, aboard a ship, is another story... to be expected to happen.




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JayLee

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Re: Bodily Functions in Writing
« Reply #18 on: September 15, 2017, 01:16:24 AM »
Poking around in old threads instead of packing, hehe. I'm productive.

Now, from an editing standpoint, I may have an odd opinion of bodily functions in writing. It comes down to: Eh. It doesn't gross me out, and I don't care if it's there. There is a big if with this. And that is if it's relevant to the plot.

If it's just there to show that the author thinks about little daily details like this, I'm going to go after it with the same eye for deletion as I would an adjective that weakens a sentence. Not because it's gross or "taboo" (never heard of mentioning the bathroom to be taboo before. Lady problems, yes. Bathroom stuff, no), but because it's a space-eating monster. (And don't get me wrong. I love a good adjective and will protect as many as I can, but sometimes they are just wasting ink).

I can think of an exception though. If we've seen every minute of a character's life for three days and they haven't wandered off to empty out the tank... I'm gonna start wondering about their health. But getting that deep into a character's life could be really boring anyway.

Personally, I haven't discovered the relevance of it in my writing yet. So I haven't.
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katfireblade

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Re: Bodily Functions in Writing
« Reply #19 on: December 11, 2017, 02:54:38 AM »
it's just not a polite topic of conversation, at least in most western countries. If you have to go and there's company, you politely excuse yourself and don't further discuss it. You just kind of pretend it didn't happen. If possible, you try to slip away and be discreet. There is definitely a taboo there.

Are you in the US by any chance? Cause I would say it's less so in the UK. Of course it also depends on your company and where you are... but like I was out with my mum the other day and she commented that every conversation seemed to go back to about shit :P I can also have random/comfortable talks with at least one friend about it too in a detailed way and others a bit less so.

I think this may be a "certain circles" thing. There seem to be bigger taboos on it depending on conservatism and/or class level. But I can honestly say after living in five states and probably quintuple that in both cities and small town, I haven't often run into it. Everything from poop jokes (from full grown men, no less *sigh*) to just proclaiming "I gotta pee" before leaving the room has been common.

It may also be generational--it would mortify my mother, and in my generation it was hit-or-miss. Most Millennials I know don't even bat an eye.

Keeping in mind that there are still rules for "polite company," like, never being loud and gross in public areas or doing it in front of company, stuff like that. You know, the social grease on the wheels of society.

As for writing?

Really, it's gotta have a reason. If I mention someone going off to pee, they'd better get poison ivy from squatting in the woods, or see a ghost in the bathroom mirror, or something that moves the plot along. I'll even settle for a bathroom break to make a character leave the room so something can happen without their presence.

Vomit does appear because doesn't it always? People get sick, or poisoned, or get hit really hard in the stomach. But I won't do the vomiting-in-fear thing. Personal preference; it's become really big recently and I'm starting to read it everywhere, and it just annoys me. I have never vomited in fear, nor known anyone to do it, and yet somehow it's become a modern literary epidemic.

Menses? Oh, those have shown up more than once. Usually an offhand comment or a joke made, but one of my favorite things ever is a single father who is raising three young girls alone. Keep in mind, he has giant blood in him, so he is almost seven foot tall, lives as a farmer outwardly but has been known to go on secret missions for the king, and in his younger days was something of a hero.

Two of his girls are now of "that age" and have started their periods, as well as having questions about boys and sex and changes, and this big bad warrior just melts into himself and slinks off to ask their female housekeeper for help. Seriously, if a bad guy ever truly wanted to hold him at bay, all he'd have to do is kidnap this dude's daughter and force her to talk about her menses.

Comedy does ensue.  :D