So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot

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Tyrannohotep

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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #30 on: June 29, 2016, 07:07:31 PM »
I love this <3

Can I hit you up for tips on using digital painters/graphics tablets?

I just got one a few monthss ago, and I'm having more trouble than I thought tracing over old images and making them look alright =____=  I can only do from scratch, and even then, I'm struggling to get the effect I want.
What kind of problems are you having? It sounds like you're aiming for a particular effect but don't know how to achieve it. I do think practice makes perfect with that tool, since I found it rather awkward on initial usage too.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #31 on: June 29, 2016, 07:58:15 PM »
Anyway, new stuff...


The Egyptian goddesses Sekhmet and Bastet (left and right respectively) are having a little spar together. Don't worry, it's the friendly kind.

Obviously I hatched the idea after watching a clip from The Mummy Returns, which has the two leading Egyptian ladies prize-fighting for the Pharaoh's entertainment. It's historically inaccurate and racially miscast to atrocious degrees, but at least it was a fun concept. It's also why Bastet is wielding sai even though those come from Japan.

Normally Sekhmet is the one portrayed in red clothing, with one of her epithets being "Lady in Red". But here I wanted to reference the two goddesses coming from different parts of Egypt. Bastet was associated with Lower Egypt (in the north, downriver) whereas Sekhmet represented Upper Egypt (in the south, upriver). Therefore Bastet gets red clothing in reference to Lower Egypt's red crown, whereas Sekhmet has a white/blue palette in allusion to Upper Egypt's white crown. That's also why the goddesses in my portrayal have different skin colors, with Sekhmet having darker skin since Upper Egypt is immediately downriver of the Sudan and Lower Egypt is adjacent to the Mediterranean basin.


Another iteration of one of my favorite themes: Egyptian chicks interacting with African wildlife. This time, she's facing off against a giant leopard.


A Tyrannosaurus rex gives off a territorial roar within sight of a misty waterfall deep in the jungle. It's always fun to juxtapose dinosaurs against such scenic backdrops.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #32 on: June 30, 2016, 12:57:21 AM »

Quick portraits of two of the ancient world's earliest recorded empire-builders, Narmer/Menes of Upper Egypt and Sargon of Akkad. Narmer was the guy who unified all the tribes of Egypt under the so-called First Dynasty of the Pharaonic period, whereas Sargon of Akkad brought all of Mesopotamia and surrounding regions of the Middle East under his sway. Together they were among the first rulers recorded in history to have established extensive nation-states linking together what were once competing tribes or city-states.

Narmer and Sargon were not contemporaries, and I don't think anyone knows if either would have been aware of the other. But I like to imagine that Sargon saw Narmer's Egyptian empire as an inspiration for his own Mesopotamian ambitions and sought to bring about the same order and unity in the Fertile Crescent that Narmer brought to the Nile Valley. Maybe we will never know if that was the case at all...
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #33 on: July 02, 2016, 04:05:00 PM »

If you enter "African art" into Google's image search function, you'll see a lot of highly stylized paintings with these faceless black silhouettes against a reddish-orange "sunset" background. I have no idea where that style originated, but I wanted to see how ancient Egypt would look if painted that way. So, here's the Pharaoh Hatshepsut gazing at the Pyramids from across the Nile in the so-called "African art" style.

Seriously, who invented that style anyway? It doesn't look like any traditional African art form I know of.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #34 on: July 02, 2016, 07:41:19 PM »

This is my 2016 celebration of our Independence Day, or the 4th of July as we tend to call it. I wanted to convey a sense of progressive optimism with this piece by showing a multicultural trio of Americans looking forward to the light ahead while leaving the darkness behind them.

There's a lot in my country's past that I am not proud of. Our country was founded on behalf of a very limited subsection of the population, namely white men who could afford property, while oppressing or even brutalizing everyone else. Even after two centuries and four decades, there's still a lot of work to be done before the scars of those past injustices are fully healed. Nonetheless, as a country, we got to keeping working at it. Hopefully someday we can at last be the Land of the Free for everyone, a land where all men and women can enjoy equal opportunity and liberty. Hopefully someday we can make America great for once.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #35 on: July 05, 2016, 07:57:19 PM »

In an alternate timeline where dinosaurs never went extinct, the descendant of Tyrannosaurus rex shares the waterways of Hell Creek with the earliest manatees.

The evolution of the Sirenia (manatees and dugongs) goes back between 50-60 million years ago depending on which sources you check. That's only 5-15 million years after the non-avian dinosaurs died out. So perhaps if they had stuck out for only a little longer, dinosaurs might have drunk from the same waters where the first manatees frolicked.


My original heroine Nyarai, a muvhimi (huntress) of the Vazhona nation, drawn in a pseudo-Disney princess style. At least her facial features, with the prominent eyes, are meant to channel Disney.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #36 on: July 06, 2016, 07:58:40 PM »

This is something I drew to cheer myself up after some recent unpleasant happenings both in my personal life and on the news. My sister went through a big Barbie phase back in the day, and I felt creating my own variation on something that's brought joy to so many little girls would brighten my mood.

This is not an official redesign from Mattel. I believe they've already released a large number of non-white dolls in their long history, but Barbie the blond remains the one everyone knows. So I figured that by redesigning Barbie into an African chick, I'd get a stronger reaction out of people than if I passed her off as a separate character with less recognition.

Barbie (c) Mattel, of course.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #37 on: July 08, 2016, 04:04:08 PM »

I'm still saddened by recent news events, and this was my way of conveying my mood through drawing. I had this mental image of a sweet little African-American child embracing his stuffed toy for comfort in a cruel world. In my opinion, there are few things sadder than seeing a kid being forced out of their innocence to confront the harshness of the outside world. And for too many children out there, this is their reality.


My depiction of the goddess Astarte, known to the Babylonians as Ishtar and the Sumerians before them as Inanna. She was a goddess associated with love, fertility, and (in seeming contradiction) war that originated in Mesopotamia, but her cult spread to many reaches of the ancient Middle East. It even diffused into Egypt after their empire started branching out into the Levant, with the Egyptians identifying her with their native warrior goddess Sekhmet. It was this transcontinental distribution of Astarte's following that I wanted to capture here.

My rendition of Astarte is almost literally biracial, with half of her body representing her Mesopotamian origins and the other half representing Egypt. The dress too juxtaposes Mesopotamian and Egyptian fashions in a split style. I think it makes for a unique contrast in her appearance.


The machimoi were soldiers of native Egyptian heritage during the Ptolemaic period, when Egypt was under the control of an originally Macedonian dynasty. They would have occupied a lower "auxiliary" position in the army and served under Greco-Macedonian commanders, whereas soldiers of Greek and Macedonian heritage occupied the elite ranks. It was a bit like how African-American soldiers in the Civil War tended to fight under white commanders.

I believe the upper garment my machimoi is wearing is supposed to be padded linen. You may recognize it from certain computer games like Rome II: Total War, although truthfully I haven't ever seen it depicted in Egyptian art. I presume it would have been a recent development after various foreign conquests like those of the Ptolemies.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #38 on: July 09, 2016, 09:31:22 PM »

This lady would be the queen of some (heretofore undiscovered) lost civilization in ancient Australia. I've never heard of Aboriginal Australian societies with a monarchy, since all the ones known to history lived as hunter-gatherers. But who knows what mysteries are hidden in the swamps of the Outback?

Whatever the case, I simply wanted to draw a pretty Aboriginal Australian chick.


Can't you tell I love Tyrannosaurus rex?
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #39 on: July 11, 2016, 11:54:04 PM »

A work-in-progress Triceratops model I'm making in 3ds Max as practice. Obviously the forearms need a lot of work, but at some point I plan to import this into ZBrush for further refinement. In general I've found ZBrush easier to use than Max so far, but apparently some people have this workflow where they "block out" the model in Max before refining it in ZBrush.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #40 on: July 14, 2016, 10:30:07 PM »

Portrait of a random young lady from the kingdom of Kush, a longstanding rival (and at one point conqueror) of ancient Egypt. In the end the Kushites would have the last laugh since their empire lasted until 350 AD; long after Egypt had been conquered by a succession of Assyrians, Persians, Macedonians, and Romans.

It appears to have been customary for the Kushites to dye their hair red or yellow as shown in Egyptian paintings. On the other hand, Egyptians did indulge in the practice too; Ramses II was found with red henna in his hair (hence starting a rumor that he was a natural redhead), and the daughter of Khufu from the Old Kingdom was portrayed with a yellow wig. Hair dying like this is still practiced by various ethnic groups throughout the African continent, including the Ethiopian Hamer, the Kenyan Maasai, and the Namibian Himba. However it came about, I think it provides an eye-grabbing contrast against dark Sudanic skin.


What if the Doomguy (that is, the protagonist from Doom) had a female counterpart? She could either be a genderswap or his girlfriend, or maybe even his wife. Because of course he'd have to get hitched with a chick who shared his passion for blasting hellspawn into pieces.

I have fond memories of Doom III back in my high school years, and I think the new Doom game is pretty sweet too (even if its gameplay and pacing are totally different from its predecessor).


This Egyptian dude is beating a sort of strap-on drum that is known to have been played in military contexts. With its elongated shape, it would have resembled a conga drum, but you would have beaten it on both ends.

I don't really care for the "Arabic" soundtracks used so often in ancient Egyptian-themed media. I think it stems from a tendency to confuse ancient Egypt with later Islamic, Arabic-speaking cultures in North Africa (which is a bit like confusing the Aztec and Maya civilizations with modern Hispanic/Latinx culture). Most sources say the sound of ancient Egyptian music can only be guessed at, but the positioning of holes on Egyptian flutes suggests they used a pentatonic (five-tone) scale like that used in many West African countries today. So I think a generally African quality is more likely for indigenous Egyptian music than the Arabic stereotype.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #41 on: July 16, 2016, 01:02:04 AM »

She is the Queen of the Sun-blessed South, and she's fiercely proud of it.

If you're familiar with the history of fantasy art, you will probably recognize the subject matter and composition as inspired by Frank Frazetta's "Egyptian Queen". In fact I was originally going to make this setting Egyptian, but switched to something more fantastical (albeit still subtly Egyptian-influenced). Frank Frazetta truly was one of the great pioneers of modern fantasy art and I had to pay tribute to him.


This was inspired by the upcoming strategy game Civilization VI, specifically its animated "leader scenes". I wasn't too crazy about their nominating Cleopatra to represent the Egyptian civilization, since she wasn't that successful and wasn't even all that "Egyptian" in terms of ancestry or cultural upbringing. I feel Hatshepsut would better represent Egypt since she ruled it with competence during its golden days and was more or less a "pure" native Egyptian. Maybe when the game comes out I'll mod her in as an alternate Egyptian leader to the default Cleopatra.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #42 on: July 16, 2016, 08:50:22 PM »

The Paraceratherium, the humongous rhinoceros cousin formerly known as Indricotherium or Baluchitherium, once roamed the deserts of Asia during the Oligocene Epoch (34-23 million years ago). If it had survived to the days of recorded history, perhaps the Persian Empire would have found it handy as a battle mount. They certainly could have crushed all 300 of those pesky Spartans with a few of those magnificent beasties!
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #43 on: July 18, 2016, 01:43:40 PM »

My rendition of the Kushite warrior-king Taharqa, who inherited from his conqueror father Piye an empire that straddled all of Egypt and Nubia (northern Sudan). He enjoyed a prosperous reign until he ran into trouble with the invading Assyrian Empire. He put up a fierce and valiant fight, but in the end the Assyrians ended up seizing Lower (northern) Egypt away from his control. He is also known to have supported the Hebrews' revolts against Assyrian domination of Israel, earning him a mention in the Old Testament (2 Kings 19:9, Isaiah 37:9) with the name "Tirhakah".

This is sort of a follow-up to my earlier Civilization-inspired "leader scene" featuring the Egyptian Pharaoh Hatshepsut. I rather like how the composition turned out here.


If the Egyptian civilization wanted to attract tourists or traders, this might have been how they'd build their big entrance. Sparing no expense, of course. ;)

To be honest, I wonder if this could use a darker, more dramatic color palette. Right now it looks very cheerful. Maybe I could make the walls darker to make the fire of the torches stand out more, but then off-white seems more Egyptian-ish as far as wall colors go.


After hiding amidst some gnarled jungle vines, a prehistoric ancestor of the boa constrictor snatches a hapless little dinosaur from the undergrowth. Because even when dinosaurs ruled the earth, they would have coexisted with competition.

The dinosaur being attacked isn't based on a particular species, but is rather a generic small ornithischian type.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #44 on: July 18, 2016, 02:04:45 PM »
I forgot that I never posted here or told u directly, but I SUPER LOVE YOUR ART. !!! You just have so much cool detailing, and I just really really love it.

(I'm biased towards Bastet and Sekhmet in particular, since they're my favorite goddesses. War kitties, I love them!)