So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot

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Tyrannohotep

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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #540 on: March 01, 2018, 11:48:18 AM »

This is my attempt to paint a portrait of the Egyptian Queen Nefertari using my mom's acrylic set. Unfortunately, it turned out looking way more "impressionistic" than I had hoped for. I should've waited until Mom got back home from her trip to Vegas, but I was too eager to try out a different medium from my usual. Oh well, with practice will come perfect...


This would be the sketch I used as a base for my painting.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #541 on: March 03, 2018, 02:36:04 PM »

I've gone back to working on my fantasy novel with Queen Rashekhu, and I want to do a little bit of world-building for the story while I write.

These two represent the people of Ta'Sutja, the ethnic group from whom my protagonist Rashekhu hails. Their civilization is not actually a singular nation-state, but rather divided into a bunch of small competing kingdoms (e.g. Djakhem and Nekhubta) in a vast jungle basin where dinosaurs and other prehistoric reptiles roam wild. Their religion is polytheistic, but each kingdom venerates a different dinosaur as its totemic patron (for instance, Djakhem venerates the Tyrannosaurus and Nekhubta the Ankylosaurus). For the most part, the culture of all the Ta'Sutjan kingdoms is a mixture of influences from ancient Egypt and various Central African cultures.

By the way, those dots, dashes, and squiggly lines on these two individuals' skin are scarifications, their way of beautifying themselves.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #542 on: March 13, 2018, 03:24:49 PM »
Yo, it's been a while since I last posted anything in this thread. Let me update you dudes on what I've been doing the past week or so.


Ceratosaurus nasicornis prowls a Late Jurassic rainforest sometime between 153 and 148 million years ago. Found in North America and possibly also Africa and southern Europe, this meat-eating dinosaur would have been a contemporary and possibly a competitor with the larger Allosaurus, but seems to have preferred wetter environments. However, Ceratosaurus would have been more closely related to Cretaceous abelisaurs such as Carnotaurus and Majungasaurus. The nose horn for which the dinosaur is named could have been used either for display or for fighting over mates.


Sekhmet, the Egyptian goddess of war and violence, descends from the heavens to unleash her wrath upon those insolent mortals.

Getting the background to look right presented a bit of a challenge, but I think the lens flare I added in Photoshop gives a nice extra touch.


Amanirenas was the ruling Kentake (Queen) of Kush, in what is now Sudan, between 40 and 10 BC. She is best known for her fight against the Roman Empire after attacking its newly acquired Egyptian province. Although the Roman retaliation was brutal (they even sacked the former Kushite capital of Napata), Amanirenas managed to arrange a second standoff against the Romans that convinced them to withdraw back to Egypt, never to challenge her again. Some accounts describe Amanirenas as being blind in one eye, which is why I drew an eye-patch on her this time.


The young woman you see here represents the Badarian culture which appeared in central and southern Egypt between 4400 and 4000 BC. These prehistoric progenitors of the Egyptian civilization would have probably subsisted as semi-nomadic cattle-herders moving between the Saharan savannas and the Nile floodplains every year, supplementing their diet with cultivated wheat and barley as well as wild game. Despite this "tribal" lifestyle of theirs, the Badarians shared with their "civilized" descendants an affinity for body ornamentation (such as tattooing and jewelry made from copper, ivory, bone, and precious stones) and mummifying their dead to be buried with goods for the afterlife. It goes to show you that even the mightiest empires have their genesis in what we would consider "primitive" conditions.


A young woman from the Badarian culture of predynastic Egypt (4400-4000 BC) dances with her arms raised overhead in imitation of cattle horns. This particular dancing pose is known not only from predynastic Egyptian art, but also wall reliefs from the pharaonic period many centuries later. Today, women of the Dinka ethnic group in South Sudan still perform a similar style of dance, which makes sense given the Dinka have a cattle-herding culture comparable to that of early predynastic Egyptians.


Our predynastic Egyptian heroine from 4400-4000 BC now leads a hunting party across the savannas that will someday become the Egyptian Sahara. Although cattle-herding and floodplain agriculture would have provided most of the predynastic Egyptian diet, artwork from this period abounds with hunting themes, so it must have still been a popular pastime (in addition to providing an additional source of protein). In pharaonic times, it would have been the Pharaohs and nobility who did most of the hunting.

With this piece, I wanted to practice my foreshortening by having my girl point her spear at something up ahead.


While we're on the theme of women dancing, enjoy this doodle of a Hebrew belly dancer from ancient Israel. We tend to imagine the biblical Israelites as a pious rather than sensual people, in large part as a result of modern Christian ideals of sexual inhibition and chastity. However, given that ancient Hebrew culture comes from the same Semitic, Middle Eastern cultural background as the Islamic Arabs, I would not be surprised at all if Israelite girls had the same penchant for belly dancing as their Arab sisters. And unless they happened to be all asexual (or gay), even biblical heroes like Abraham, Moses, or even Jesus could not have minded the sight of scantily clad dancing girls every now and then. XD


This is my speculative portrait of the Ptolemaic Egyptian Queen Cleopatra VII’s heretofore unidentified mother. Although we know from the historical record that Cleopatra’s father was Ptolemy XII Auletes (117-51 BC), the identity of her mother remains less certain. It could have been Ptolemy XII’s official Queen Cleopatra V, or it could have been any of the various side chicks that the male Ptolemaic rulers were known for taking. Of course, I went with the latter scenario by representing her as a native Egyptian girl. However, the falcon design on her earring is based on one found on coins minted during the Ptolemaic dynasty.


After playing the kingdom of Kush in the game Total War: Rome II some more, I was in the mood to doodle another Kushite warrior babe. I might make her a character in a story sometime in the future, but right now I have bigger fish to fry with regards to writing.

As an aside, it's a pet peeve of mine to see Kush characterized in modern sources as a "sub-Saharan" African civilization. It may have had trade contacts with people south of the Sahara, but since the heart of Kushite territory was within the desert itself, it should technically qualify as a North African country rather than a sub-Saharan one.


Kushite horsemen ride their white-coated steeds towards battle in the sandy wastes of the eastern Sahara. A scene like this would probably take place during the Meroitic period (280 BC to 350 AD) of Kush’s history, because the chariots that both Egyptian and Kushite armies had once employed would have become obsolete by that point. Regardless, it appears the Kushites had developed an even stronger passion for horses than their Egyptian brethren, as shown by horse burials in their royal tombs as well as Assyrian records mentioning the importation of horses bred in Kush.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #543 on: March 18, 2018, 02:24:05 PM »

Sometime during the Roman imperial occupation of Egypt, this rebellious Egyptian warrior is on a daring mission to infiltrate a Roman fort. Suffice to say that she's not all that crazy about her once mighty and ancient civilization being reduced to a colonial breadbasket.

I know this isn't a scene that would have likely taken place in real history, but it was too cool to resist.


Ankylosaurus magniventris is the namesake and possibly the largest known member of the ankylosaurid family of dinosaurs, with a body mass of around four tons. A native of North America around 68 to 65 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous, the plant-eating Ankylosaurus would have been a contemporary of both the Triceratops and the Tyrannosaurus. Its spiky body armor and club-like tail would have provided it with natural protection against even the fiercest and hungriest tyrannosaur.


This itinerant warrior is hiking through the desert hills after having hacked her way through a scuffle with her khopesh blade. Perhaps she will find even more trouble awaiting her on the road ahead...


I wish I had a more creative backstory for this simple portrait. But all I can say at the moment is that I wanted to try out a different method of drawing with fainter outlines than my usual. Sometimes trying out a new technique can help you with inspiration.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #544 on: March 23, 2018, 02:28:45 PM »

Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops prorsus face off against each other deep in the jungles of Cretaceous North America, around 68 million years ago. These two have always been my favorite dinosaurs, not least because each dinosaur really would have made a formidable adversary for the other. It's a perfect clash of the titans, if you ask me.


10,000 years ago on the plains of what will eventually become the Sahara Desert, a young farmer girl has filled her basket with cereal grains she has collected during the day’s harvest. The wooden instrument under her belt is a primitive sickle studded with stone bladelets for cutting.

Recent archaeological excavations in southwestern Libya have shown that African people were extensively harvesting and perhaps even cultivating “wild” cereals in the region 10,000 years before present, roughly contemporary with similar experiments in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East. Not only have over 200,000 specimens of grain been recovered at the dig in question, but so have pieces of woven baskets that would have been used to carry the grains, as well as pieces of pottery with cereal soup residue still on them. Perhaps future discoveries will show that Africa was among the earliest, if not the earliest, cradles of agriculture in human history.


Is the goth subculture still a thing in this day and age? Regardless, I thought a goth chick would make for a fun break from the historical, fantasy, and prehistoric stuff I usually do. The most enjoyable aspect of this exercise was how it let me go wild with her design.


I didn't have a specific ethnic identity in mind for this character when I doodled her. However, the designs on her skirt are inspired by textiles from the Kuba kingdom in the southeastern Congo. The Kuba would weave their famous cloth from raffia palm leaf fibers and then color it with vegetable dyes. These textiles were used not only for clothing, but also sleeping mats and even currency among the Kuba.


This is my interpretation of the female Tyrannosaurus rex named "Rexy" (or alternatively "Roberta"), who starred in the first and fourth Jurassic Park films. As a lifelong Jurassic Park/World fan, I've lately been feeling a bit worn down by all the negativity I've seen aimed towards the franchise, particularly in the paleontology fandom. Everyone is entitled to their opinion on the movies, but personally I liked JW a great deal and hope the Fallen Kingdom sequel will be fun as well. That said, I couldn't resist "redesigning" a few aspects of Rexy's anatomy to better fit modern scientific knowledge about tyrannosaurids. I don't expect the JP/JW dinosaurs to ever be accurate without a total reboot of the series, but it's still nice to imagine how they would look if they did get a design update.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2018, 02:30:53 AM by Tyrannohotep »
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #545 on: March 31, 2018, 06:42:49 PM »

This ancient Egyptian sorceress can defend herself and her resting place with both her red-hot magical staff and her army of mummified sisters. You would not want to meet them if you broke into their tomb!

These are all characters from a short horror/fantasy story I recently completed, which is titled "Staff of the Red Sun". You can read it here on my new website's blog.

And this would be the pencil-shaded version of the sorceress:
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #546 on: April 08, 2018, 04:22:06 PM »

This would be a fantasy character I've named Tjuyu, who is supposed to be this princess with a vain and haughty personality. I still think she came out gorgeous.


The man you see here would be a priest from the Indus Valley civilization (also known as the Harappan civilization) which developed along the Indus River in what is now Pakistan between 3300 and 1300 BC, thus laying the foundations for later urbanized culture in South Asia. Although their distinctive written script remains to be deciphered as of this writing, it is likely the Indus Valley people spoke a Dravidian language like those spread across the Indian subcontinent prior to the Aryan incursions from Central Asia after 1500 BC. The face paint on the priest's face is speculative, but is inspired by face-painting traditions among some Dravidian peoples today.


This is my interpretation of an angel from the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim religious traditions. I don't believe in angels myself, of course, but I won't mind if the people who do appreciate this portrayal.


An ape of some sort surveys the jungle canopy while clinging to a vine on an emergent tree bough. I didn't have any particular species in mind for the ape, but I imagine he's related to the human lineage after it split from chimpanzees around 7-8 million years ago in the late Miocene. In which case, he'd be a very early example of a hominin.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #547 on: April 14, 2018, 08:00:05 AM »

The drawing you see here came illustrates a little story idea I developed about an African-American aviatrix named Bernice Smith, who would serve as one of the Tuskegee Airmen in WWII. Inspired by real-life early female pilots like Bessie Coleman and Amelia Earhart, Bernice was going to crash-land into this lost continent of dinosaurs and other prehistoric wildlife somewhere in the Bermuda Triangle. And much like Earhart, she would have to survive as a castaway in this hostile environment while awaiting her rescue.

It might end up a bit of a silly throwaway idea (I’m not even sure there were female pilots among the Tuskegee Airmen), but I still wanted to get it out somehow.


It's hot and humid as usual in the Late Jurassic, so this Brontosaurus excelsus is cooling off by taking a dip in the river and spraying some water from its mouth onto its back (much like an elephant might spray water from its trunk).


Out on the Late Jurassic savannas, an Allosaurus fragilis attacks a Stegosaurus ungulatus. If the allosaur is going to bring the seven-ton plant-eater down, it must confront its prey's formidable tail spikes (collectively referred to as a thagomizer, after the late Thag Simmons).

In fact, we have fossil evidence from a wound marked on an allosaur's pubic bone that such confrontations between the Allosaurus and Stegosaurus actually would have taken place. Apparently, a stegosaur's tail spike had struck the allosaur in the crotch, leaving behind an injury that became infected and killed the predator.


A “cavegirl” sort of character watches a Tyrannosaurus and Triceratops battle while hiding behind a tree. It must be a frightful thing to witness close up, but whoever wins, she’ll have plenty to scavenge from the loser’s carcass.

And yes, I got the idea from a scene in the old caveman movie One Million Years BC, wherein Raquel Welch and John Richardson’s characters hide from a battle between a Triceratops and a Ceratosaurus.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2018, 08:12:25 AM by Tyrannohotep »
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #548 on: April 14, 2018, 10:19:14 AM »

I wanted to flesh out Bernice Smith, my Tuskegee Airwoman character, a bit more by drawing her with her boyfriend Horace Thompson. Horace, a professor of paleontology at the University of Pennsylvania, is actually the more brash and adventurous of the pair, in contrast to the naturally shy and reserved Bernice. In fact, the reason Bernice pursues an aviation career at the first place is to impress Horace, who would like her to show more boldness and take more risks. Little could either of them anticipate exactly what dangers she would find herself confronting...

By the way, while a pairing like this might seem unlikely for the 1940s, Horace's home state of Pennsylvania is one of few in the US that had repealed its anti-miscegenation laws before 1887 (most of the rest of the country would only catch up between 1948 and 1967).
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #549 on: April 19, 2018, 09:40:22 PM »

This is a quick design for a futuristic skyscraper with an African cultural inspiration. In several rural cultures across the continent, each “room” in a family household is represented by its own hut separate from the others, therefore giving the whole compound the appearance of a miniature village. I figured that, if translated to a technologically futuristic society, this sort of setup would have a cluster of “huts” connected to a central shaft-like skyscraper via walkways, with each story of the building belonging to a different family. It’d be this culture’s version of an apartment building.

By the way, those are supposed to be rays of light beaming from the top of each “hut”. Please also notice that the huts’ roofs have solar panels mounted on them to provide them with energy.


A giant icthyosaur of the shastasaurid family dives into the ocean in search of deep-sea prey such as squid. Recent fossil discoveries in the UK suggest that marine reptiles like this could grow up to 85 feet long, nearly as big as today’s blue whale. This would make them among the biggest creatures ever to live on earth, whether in the sea or on land. Unlike other ichtyosaurs, however, the giant shastasaurids would not have possessed any teeth when fully grown!


This is the colored version of an earlier drawing I did of my two characters from the 1940s, Bernice Smith and Howard Thompson. Originally, Bernice was supposed to be a woman who would go on to become one of the Tuskegee Airmen, but I later learned that there wouldn’t have been any female Tuskegee pilots. Still, I thought she and Howard made for a cute couple and wanted to give them some color and a background.

By the way, I absolutely love how Egyptian-esque art deco designs often appear.


It’s a simple yet fun doodle of a prehistoric chick with an Afro. ‘Nuff said.


The Queen of Egypt is expressing her irritation at someone by giving them the side-eye. We tend to picture ancient Egyptian royalty as looking stoic all the time (much like what you see in their artistic portrayals), so it’s always amusing to give them more intense expressions like this.


I doodled this Stegosaurus ungulatus drinking in my sketchbook around 1 am when I had difficulty going to sleep. Stegosaurus is a really magnificent animal, by the way.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #550 on: April 22, 2018, 03:02:13 PM »
This Sunday, I got a couple of cartoons with more humorous intentions!

I mean no offense to any plus-size friends of mine. But the pun here should be self-evident if you've ever heard jokes about your momma.


No matter how friendly they may appear, never take your tyrannosaur neighbor’s offer of hospitality at face value. Especially if they’re inviting you over for dinner.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #551 on: April 28, 2018, 07:17:59 PM »

Around 3700 BC, a king of predynastic Upper Egypt surveys his domain from atop his tame elephant on a rocky precipice. Archaeological excavations at the predynastic site of Nekhen (also known as Hierakonpolis) in southern Egypt have revealed the skeletal remains of numerous animals kept in the local king’s royal menagerie, including an African elephant. It’s tempting for me to imagine that the predynastic Egyptians might have ridden such mighty beasts into battle, much as the people of Kush apparently did during the Meroitic period several millennia later.

Unfortunately, once the Sahara became a desert ~3000 BC, elephants would no longer be found in Egypt for the people to use. Which would have really sucked for them, because those animals would have come in handy for pulling big stones around.


Lee Jun-fan (1940-1973), better known as Bruce Lee, was an actor and martial artist of Hong Kong Chinese heritage who is best known for starring in films such as Enter the Dragon and Fist of Fury. However, another major contribution of his is the development of a martial arts philosophy known as Jeet Kune Do, which aimed for greater flexibility and applicability in real fights than other martial arts styles of the day. The modern sport of mixed martial arts (MMA) owes much of its influence to Lee and his Jeet Kune Do philosophy.


A warrior trained in the martial arts sharpens her skill at striking with her knee. I have no name for this character yet, but her cultural background is supposed to be vaguely West African in flavor. Anyway, drawing martial artists like this in action gives me an opportunity to practice more dynamic action poses.


Parasaurolophus walkeri, among the most famous of the hadrosaurid dinosaurs, sings a resonant song deep in the jungles of Late Cretaceous North America, circa 75 million years ago. One model of Parasaurolophus’s vocalization, designed in 2012, suggests it would have sounded rather metallic and blaring, almost like a trumpet. Imagine that echoing through the woods back in the Cretaceous!


A young stablehand from ancient Kush is leading her horse by the reins towards its stall. This was inspired by the recent excavation of a chariot horse’s burial in the region of Sudan known as Upper Nubia, which was the Kushite civilization’s heartland. This finding further highlights the Kushite culture’s special affinity for horses and equestrianism, which seems to have surpassed that of their Egyptian neighbors.


This African-American emcee is rapping on a mic under bright concert lights. The tattoos on her skin are based on symbols from various cultures across Africa, as a way of honoring her ancestral heritage. One of the most fun aspects of designing African-American characters like this one is that you can combine influences from different African cultures when designing their outfits and jewelry since most African-Americans are descended from a mix of different African peoples (albeit mostly from West and Central Africa).
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #552 on: May 06, 2018, 11:18:53 AM »

It’s a warm midday on the plains of Northwest Africa circa 8000 BC. This woman of the Capsian culture is cooling herself off with water drunk from an ostrich egg converted to a bottle.

Named for the town of Qafsah in southern Tunisia, the Mesolithic culture known as the Capsian occupied the region of northwestern Africa south of the Atlas Mountains between 8000 and 2700 BC. Traces of their culture left behind include rock paintings, jewelry made from seashells and ostrich-eggshell beads, and whole ostrich eggs converted into containers such as the bottle pictured here.

Some archaeologists speculate that the Capsian people would have represented the earliest speakers of Afrasan (or Afroasiatic) languages to colonize Northwest Africa after migrating from further southeast (that is, from the Afrasan linguistic homeland in Northeast Africa). If so, the Capsian language could have evolved into modern Berber, with its original speakers intermixing with more Mediterranean-looking people from further north (along with later colonists from Phoenicia, southern Europe, Arabia, etc.) to produce the current Northwest African population.


The hybrid dinosaur Indoraptor from the upcoming Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom takes a bite out of the Marvel supervillain Thanos. This crossover confrontation came to mind after I saw the recent Avengers: Infinity War. It was an OK movie for the most part, but suffice to say that I found the cliffhanger ending disappointingly abrupt. I can only hope Fallen Kingdom doesn’t end on such a dour note.


The character here was originally going to be another one of my jungle girls, but I decided to switch things up a bit by making her a fisher-woman with a trident instead. The fish she’s caught for her next meal would be a juvenile blacktip reef shark, which is native to the warm waters of the Indian and western Pacific Oceans.


This would be a male counterpart to the "cavegirl" with an Afro that I drew a short while ago. I thought that, since I’ve drawn so many prehistoric babes over the years, it’s only fair that I depict their male compatriots at least once.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #553 on: May 11, 2018, 10:40:12 AM »

The Egyptian Queen Nefertari, famous consort to Pharaoh Ramses II, is simply chillin’ on a comfy divan in her palace.

The divan’s wood is supposed to be black ebony, which was a popular material for ancient Egyptian carpenters to work with (after they imported it from lands south of the Sahara). In fact, the word “ebony” comes from a Greek corruption of the Egyptian term hbny.


Watching a few episodes of the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon put me in a little ninja mood. And so this Egyptian ninja character was born! Hotep-bunga, dudes!


Ever wondered how the Great Sphinx of Giza really lost its nose? If you ask the guys at the History Channel, they’ll probably propose a scenario like the one illustrated here.

In all seriousness, it seems likely that the actual culprit was a Sufi Muslim dude in the 14th century, who took off the Sphinx’s nose after seeing Egyptian peasants making offerings to it (since Islam forbids idolatry). Apparently, he got himself executed for vandalism by the local authorities for desecrating such an iconic national monument. It’d be like someone today launching rockets into our Mt. Rushmore.


Two young hunters, who could be a couple (or alternatively brother and sister), stalk through the jungle with iron-tipped spears in hand. In the upper left of the scene, you can see the silhouette of a pterosaur soaring above the understory in the distance.

I’d like to take the opportunity to share with my readers the stages of my drawing process. Above is the finished piece, which I have colored in the program Clip Studio Paint. Below are the initial pencil sketch and then the digitally “inked” version of the drawing.
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #554 on: May 14, 2018, 09:00:45 PM »

A soldier from one of the city-states of ancient Greece wields a xiphos sword with a leaf-shaped blade that broadens towards the end. The xiphos would have been a sidearm for the Greek soldiers known as hoplites, who would have resorted to them if their spears broke or if they had to fight in really close quarters. The swords would have been made from bronze or iron (depending on the time period) and could have both cut and thrust at their targets.


An Egyptian warrior swinging his bronze epsilon ax (so named because of its resemblance to a Greek letter known as epsilon). After I did my standing Greek warrior, I wanted to draw a character with a little more motion in his pose.


The weapon that this soldier from ancient China is holding is a fire lance, one of the earliest gunpowder weapons invented in recorded history. These were spear-like weapons with fireworks attached that would shoot out projectiles or poison when lit, and they would have been used in close-quarters combat due to their limited range. Nonetheless, Chinese fire lances would have represented one of the very first stages of the modern firearm’s evolution.
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