So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot

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Tyrannohotep

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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #570 on: August 18, 2018, 01:04:27 PM »
And now for some illustrations pertinent to my current "alternate history" WIP, Skyfire!

First is our leading lady, the Egyptian priestess Itaweret (formerly named Khenmet, but I changed it because it was too similar to Kemet, the Egyptians' native name for their own country)...




This is a portrait of her companion and BFF, Sennuwy:


Here is Philos, a rural shepherd of Greek heritage who joins Itaweret and Sennuwy on their quest. Also, he has a pet Megantereon (an Old World relative of the saber-toothed cat Smilodon)


And then we have our villain, the Mycenaean warrior king Scylax:


A drawing of Dedenu, Itaweret and Sennuwy's hometown, which is an Egyptian colony on the Greek coast:


Finally, here is a map of the story's setting:
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Tyrannohotep

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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #571 on: August 26, 2018, 02:57:16 PM »

I don’t have a name or story for this random character concept yet, but she was fun as hell to design once I settled on a look for her. The scaly dinosaur-hide shield she has ended up looking a bit like the face of a mythological dragon, or maybe a ceratopsian like Chasmosaurus or Styracosaurus. I have no idea how practical that shield design or her spear would be in actual battle, but the Rule of Cool is irresistible when it comes to drawing fantasy characters.


After probing around for treasure among some ruins in the jungle, this adventurer has stumbled upon an angry python. Now she’ll understand how Indiana Jones feels about snakes!


An Egyptian military commander urges his men to persevere on their march through the desert beyond their riverside homeland. But if you had to hike through an arid landscape while withstanding temperatures in excess of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, you’d feel exhausted and thirsty too. So can you blame these soldiers for their weathered morale?

On the rocks in this scene, you can see some petroglyphs dating to Egypt’s predynastic period (which ended around 3100 BC), back when the country was still a grassy savanna like you might find in more southerly areas of Africa today.


Quick pencil doodle of Dilophosaurus wetherilli, a theropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic around 193 million years ago. There’s no evidence that this animal had a frill or could spit venom as portrayed in the Jurassic Park franchise, but it would have still been quite a powerful predator for its time (it weighed in around 400 kg, or 880 lbs).
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MarthaBechtel

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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #572 on: August 26, 2018, 03:59:38 PM »
These are pretty awesome! :D I love the art growth you show in the thread and the character designs are a lot of fun! (And gotta love the dinos!  8) )
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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #573 on: August 31, 2018, 05:10:53 PM »
These are pretty awesome! :D I love the art growth you show in the thread and the character designs are a lot of fun! (And gotta love the dinos!  8) )
Thanks!


This sketchbook doodle stars Albertosaurus sarcophagus, a smaller and nimbler cousin of the Tyrannosaurus rex which sprinted through the subtropical forests of Canada around 70 million years ago. It was even more closely related to another tyrannosaurid named Gorgosaurus libratus, which in fact has sometimes been subsumed into the Albertosaurus genus as well. Both of these dinosaurs would have been relatively lightly built and long-legged, granting them superior speed in contrast to the much more powerful T. rex.


This is Mut, an Egyptian goddess who was the consort (or “wife”) of the creator deity Amun beginning in the Middle Kingdom. In artistic representations, she commonly wore the double crown of northern and southern Egypt on top of a gold vulture headdress (the same kind of headdress that Queen Nefertari, wife of Ramses II, is known for wearing).


Despite not drawing them often, I’ve always had a small affectionate spot for gorillas. They’re our second-closest relatives after chimpanzees and bonobos, yet are said to have gentler temperaments. They are still quite intelligent animals though, and some have even been taught sign language. Anyway, the ruined obelisk behind him is supposed to commemorate a queen from some (heretofore undiscovered) ancient civilization in the Congo jungles, a bit like the lost city of Zinj from Michael Crichton’s Congo.


Triceratops is mad as hell, and he’s not going to take it anymore!

I can’t be the only one out there who has observed that the fossil skulls of ceratopsian dinosaurs, such as the famous Triceratops, often have large big nasal openings. I hypothesize in this sketch that these might have allowed for inflatable sacs behind the nostrils that would have helped amplify the animals’ calls. If so, I wouldn’t like to be standing next to a ranting trike!


This is a doodle I did in my sketchbook while waiting for my dad to finish a meeting. The character was originally going to be a generic archer babe, but later I settled on a Kushite nationality for her and giving her a pet Velociraptor (maybe like a feathered saurian bloodhound?). Of course, Velociraptor had gone extinct millions of years before the kingdom of Kush arose, but you can do anything in fantasy. The Rule of Cool shall always rule!


Sekhmet, the Egyptian goddess of war, wades through the blood of her enemies with the flames of her destructive wrath blazing behind her.

The biggest challenge with this piece was placing the shading, since the light source was coming from behind the character rather than shining onto one side. In the end I figured that, since the light would be “flowing” past her one both sides, the highlighted areas would be on the sides while the shaded areas would be in the middle. It’s quite a different look from what I’m used to, but I suppose that’s good for artistic variety.


Ma’at, the Egyptian personification of truth and justice, holds a scale balancing a feather against a human heart. The Egyptians believed that, if the feather outweighed the heart of a deceased person after they recounted the rights and wrongs they had committed in life, they would be proven truthful and so go on to enjoy the afterlife. If they lied, the heart would outweigh the feather and so would be eaten by the crocodile-headed monster Ammut while the deceased spirit perished for eternity.
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Tyrannohotep

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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #574 on: September 02, 2018, 05:36:00 PM »

I watched a recorded episode of the old Disney cartoon series “The Legend of Tarzan” (a spin-off of their Tarzan movie) and I wanted to draw a couple of Egyptian characters in the style of the show’s African characters. If you want to look it up on Youtube, the episode’s title is “Tarzan and the Eagle’s Feather”, and it’s about Tarzan helping an African prince named Basuli obtain an eagle’s feather as part of a marriage rite. Of course, Basuli’s love interest is quite attractively designed in my humble opinion.


This is my interpretation of Prince Rama and his princess Sita, the leading man and lady from the ancient Hindu epic known as the Ramayana. While most illustrations portraying these characters portray them as pale-skinned with “Caucasoid” northern Indian features, I opted instead for a darker brown “Australoid” phenotype like that of the Indian subcontinent’s aboriginal inhabitants prior to the influx of Aryan/Indo-Iranian tribes after 1500 BC. I believe it would have been these dark-skinned natives who erected the foundations of India’s urban civilization in the Indus Valley starting in 3300 BC.
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Tyrannohotep

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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #575 on: September 07, 2018, 12:59:24 PM »

After seeing the movie BlacKkKlansman (which I liked, by the way), I simply felt like doodling a babe with an Afro like many of the film’s African-American characters. They really need to make Afros fashionable again.


Underneath the treetop canopy of a Late Cretaceous forest around 68 million years ago, an arboreal dromaeosaurid perches on a gnarled tree bough. In the background, the heads of two sauropods of the species Alamosaurus sanjuanensis poke up from the understory further below.

The raptor here is a fictional species of my own creation, though it would not surprise me if such a tree-dwelling dinosaur did turn up in the fossil record sooner or later.


It occurred to me that the traditional Egyptian bread, which is flat in shape, resembles a Western-style pizza crust without any cheese or other toppings on it. In which case, why doesn’t someone out there (who would presumably possess way more money and business acumen than I do) open a pizza chain using Egyptian-style bread as the crust? They could call the chain “Pizza Pharaoh” and use a logo like the one I have designed here. Heck, they could even theme the restaurants using Egyptian architecture and artifacts. I’d certainly eat at a place like that!


I hatched the concept for this after realizing that the age of blaxploitation films overlaps with that of various prehistoric fantasy and sci-fi films (e.g. When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth and Planet of Dinosaurs). What if somebody back in the 1970s had combined the two genres and make a prehistoric blaxploitation movie with Ray Harryhausen-style dinosaurs and foxy cavegirls with Afros? I’d certainly watch that!


Here’s a little doodle Cleopatra VII, the last Queen of Egypt, with an Afro. It may not be the likeliest hairstyle for a Ptolemaic-era queen to wear (although the hairstyle was not totally unknown in ancient Egypt as some artifacts show), but I’ve been on an Afro kick this week. Additionally, it sorta channels the famous blaxploitation character Cleopatra Jones.


Drawing the facial portrait of Tyrannosaurus rex, last of the great reptiles and the king of them all, will never get old for me.

This time, however, I wanted to show the “cracked”, crocodile-like texture of the facial skin as indicated by the research of paleontologist Thomas Carr. Other theropod dinosaurs such as Neovenator and Spinosaurus appear to have possessed similar facial integument, so I am inclined to think that it was a common dinosaurian trait that may have been inherited from the common ancestor of dinosaurs and crocodilians.

By the way, those dots on the face are supposed to represent tiny bump-like sensory organs for enhanced sensitivity.
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Tyrannohotep

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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #576 on: September 09, 2018, 08:56:22 PM »

I feel that I need more practice with architecture so that I can better capture the grandeur of Egyptian and other African civilizations in my artwork. To get started with that, here’s an Egyptian interior scene that leads to an open doorway to the outside.
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Tyrannohotep

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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #577 on: September 16, 2018, 05:00:06 PM »

With Pamela Anderson and David Hasselhoff having grown a bit long in the tooth (no offense to either), they needed a new lifeguard  to keep an eye on the Californian beaches. Not only will she keep the seashore safe, she’ll also greatly improve the scenery. Oh, and she likes to play volleyball between shifts.


Sent from elsewhere in the galaxy, an exploratory probe hovers over a newly discovered world teeming with a rich diversity exotic lifeforms. The difficulty will come in once they try to bring in samples for further study…


This is a digital painting I did in Clip Studio Paint over my earlier drawing of a T. rex‘s head. Whenever I try to do one of these digital painting-type of artworks, it always ends up looking muddier than the rest of my art. Nonetheless, it’s always good to experiment in a different style every once in a while.


Nefertari, the Egyptian Queen who was married to Pharaoh Ramses II, looks all skeptical and sassy. Drawn in my more cartoon-like style.


This would be a simple sketchbook doodle of an ancient Egyptian commoner’s hut as seen from a bird’s eye perspective. It kinda looks like something you would see in an old-school real-time strategy game, which was my intention.


If I had to redesign the look of the “Velociraptors” in the Jurassic Park films to look more scientifically accurate, it would come out like this. The big changes you will notice here are the addition of bird-like feathers and the removal of the original raptors’ lizard-like lips in favor of the lipless crocodilian look. The color scheme here is based on the male raptors in the sequel The Lost World: Jurassic Park, which is my personal favorite color scheme for the franchise’s raptors (I really wish they kept it in the subsequent films).


A young woman climbs into the branches above the jungle canopy while a Pteranodon soars overhead in the distance. Our heroine sure has found herself a nice view up here!

You might recall that this is the same foxy jungle girl I created for my “Soul Age” poster a short while back. I was simply so enamored of that character’s design that I wanted to draw her again (albeit with a few tweaks, such as the ritual scarification on her right thigh).


This is my interpretation of Neith, an ancient Egyptian goddess of hunting and war as well as weaving. You could say she was an Egyptian analog to the Greek Athena and Artemis rolled into one being. Indeed, a few scholars such as Martin Bernal have suggested that Neith inspired the Greek myths about Athena, especially since Athena was sometimes said to have been born on the African continent (which the Greeks called “Libya”). I do not know if this is the scholarly consensus though.

As a goddess, Neith was commonly associated with the northern part of Egypt (called Lower Egypt since it was further down the Nile than the south), which is why I have colored her with slightly lighter skin than my other Egyptian characters (since northern Egyptians would have presumably intermixed more with Middle Eastern and Mediterranean people compared with their southern compatriots). However, she did have a cult center in what is now Esna in Upper Egypt, south of Luxor.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2018, 10:09:34 PM by Tyrannohotep »
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Tyrannohotep

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Re: So Tyrannohotep likes to draw...a lot
« Reply #578 on: September 23, 2018, 09:31:15 AM »

Meet Charlotte Elanora, the protagonist of a short sci-fi-ish story I recently finished. She’s an Australian chick of Aboriginal heritage who travels back in time and captures dinosaurs for a living. In the story I wrote with her, she’s been assigned as the primary caretaker of a Brontosaurus named Big Ben, who is being exhibited at a corporately-owned museum designed to promote a controversial new oil pipeline in Texas. When Big Ben escapes as dinosaurs in captivity are wont to do, Elanora is the one who has to track and recapture him using her tranquilizer rifle.

And this would be Big Ben himself (the scars on his left thigh are from an Allosaurus attack):
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